How to Write Conclusions That Don’t Suck

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When a guest author hands me their first sample draft, it’s often missing a conclusion — sometimes accompanied by a note of apology that they thought about it, but they don’t know how to wrap the darn thing up, and could I offer any suggestions?

I don’t blame them — conclusions are often the most challenging part of any piece, and there’s a lot of conflicting advice about how to handle them. What follows is the most common advice I share with guest authors who are struggling with writing a conclusion that resonates.

Why writing conclusions is difficult

Remember your English teacher offering some form of the following advice about how to structure an essay or thesis statement?

I don’t blame them — conclusions are often the most challenging part of any piece, and there’s a lot of conflicting advice about how to handle them. What follows is the most common advice I share with guest authors who are struggling with writing a conclusion that resonates.

Why writing conclusions is difficult

Remember your English teacher offering some form of the following advice about how to structure an essay or thesis statement?